Demo Day #2 – Startmate

The same day as the recent Startupbootcamp event, the latest cohort of 8 founders to complete Startmate’s programme in Sydney held their own Demo Day in Melbourne.

The pitches in order of appearance were (websites links embedded in the names):

Muso

A live music marketplace, connecting venues and artists. Venue booking managers are too busy to research available talent, and artists face an inordinate number of individual processes to manage bookings and post-event admin. So Muso joins the dots, curates the artists, and takes a share of the listing and booking fees. In a world where more and more independent artists are self-releasing their recordings via platforms like Bandcamp and SoundCloud, it makes sense to extend this to managing their own tour bookings. Muso already claims to have booked 400 gigs at an average fee of $300, and also plans to expand into the US, UK and NZ markets. Currently seeking $1.2m seed funding.

VAPAR

Fault detection in infrastructure is highly manual, subjective and very expensive. VAPAR is using machine learning and cloud hosting to automate the analysis of video footage for underground pipes and sewers. A task that can currently take 2 weeks to complete can now be done in 2 minutes. Clients upload their footage and fixed asset data via a web platform, and VAPAR generate a report based on the image scanning. The business model offers a free trial access, a paid pilot project engagement, and a price per metre of pipe. Currently seeking $500k in seed funding.

VEXEV

According to the founders, vascular disease is the single largest cause of death, so there is increased focus on detection and prevention. Measuring and tracking blood flow patterns can be expensive and invasive. VEXEV uses 3D imaging captured from safer and lower cost ultra-scan technology, to measure disease progression, and to monitor and predict patient outcomes. Already secured seed funding from Blackbird Ventures.

Glamazon

This is a marketplace for at-home beauty services, “bringing a salon experience to your own living room”. According to the founders, a beautician could earn $80 per treatment compared to $23 if they work in a salon. Glamazon also offers its own business management platform via a SaaS model.

Cogniant.co

An app to “predict and manage mental health disorders before they happen“. Offers a dashboard interface for clinicians to manage their client case load, using data collected on patients’ activity and behaviour via their smart phone devices and sensors. Looking to raise $1m in seed funding. My personal observation is that a key contributing factor towards certain mental health disorders appears to be increased screen time (social media, apps that track our every move, binge watching, constant content streaming and always being “on”), leading to increased isolation, among other symptoms. While I can see the value of the data capture and analysis, hopefully the process does not reinforce the negative connotations.

Pixelated Induction

Introducing ClickCharge, a scalable wireless charging system that enables any surface to become a conductive medium. Some may remember that Apple tried its own solution, AirPower, that quietly ran out of steam. ClickCharge claims to have 3 times the charging area of AirPower, and can even charge laptops, via its inter-connecting tile design. Having filed an international patent, the founders are seeking $1.7m in seed capital to fund the build of 40,000 units for which they are currently taking pre-orders.

Bioscout

A remote system for crop monitoring and disease detection, using airborne particle tracking and analysis. Having run some field trials with banana and avocado crops, the team has identified considerable cost savings for farmers, both in terms of produce protected, and reduced use of preventive chemicals. (With the industry currently spending $2.5bn on crop monitoring and disease prevention, yet still losing $2.4bn in damaged fruit, any savings must be welcome.) Remote devices provide real-time monitoring and alerts combined with an analytics dashboard. Cost is expected to be $30k per device, plus $2k per month. The latter is presumably to pay for satellite connectivity, as the founders discovered that a key challenge for farmers is the lack of mobile phone reception in remote and rural areas.

Live Graphic Systems

This startup is aiming to reduce the cost of creating branded graphics for live sports streaming, from $5k per game to $100 per game. Current solutions involve manual processes, custom software, expensive hardware and dedicated people to operate them. Live Graphic Systems offers a scalable solution that connects brands to live streaming events, at near-zero marginal cost.

Next week: Startup Vic’s EdTech Pitch Night

 

 

 

Agtech Pitch Night at SproutX

Judging by some of the news coverage, last week’s pitch night showcasing successful applicants to the SproutX agtech accelerator suggests that this will be a program worth watching. (Look out for the demo day later in the year…) With an initial cohort of 11 participants, this recent addition to Melbourne’s startup scene is showing there is an audience and a market for smart farming solutions. Founded by Findex and the National Farmers Federation, SproutX also enjoys support from Ruralco and Artesian, as well as the Victorian Government.

Given the number of pitches, my comments on each startup presentation are necessarily short:

AgriLedger

This project is driving social impact by focusing on farmers in the developing world. It offers a smart phone app that helps deliver products and services direct to farmers, such as solar power facilities and micro loans, and enables them to plan better and to share equipment with other local farmers. Currently active in Papua New Guinea, Kenya and Myanmar, AgriLedger has been supported by some high-profile NGOs and attracted some impressive backers and advocates.

However, the judges felt that the pitch didn’t contain enough of the story, or explain how it actually works.

Applant

With a tag line of “aTree in your home”, Applant has come up with a novel design for a vertical gardening system that uses aeroponics. The idea is to help people “grow more with less”, and to grow food where we live, work, eat and even play. With an underlying concept for modular food systems, Applant is about to launch a Kickstarter campaign.

The judges had hoped to learn more about the customer demand and the proposed
customer subscription model.

Bloomboxco

Delivering locally sourced and farm-fresh cut flowers direct to customers, my immediate thought was “flower miles”. Launching just recently with a monthly subscription model, Bloomboxco has already attracted around 35k followers on social media (mostly Pinterest). By its own admission, the service appeals mainly to women who enjoy contemporary design and lifestyle trends.

But the judges wanted to know what makes this business different: given that the current supply model for cut flowers is built on margin, how does Bloomboxco aim to compete?

Farmgate MSU

With their mobile slaughter unit (MSU), the team from Farmgate want to “open the gate to on-farm abattoirs”. Many farms do not have access to an abattoir thanks to industry consolidation and contraction. The MSU is designed to cut production costs, minimize animal stress, and reduce waste. While still relying on central butchery services, the MSU has the potential to add value, especially for premium products, as it can operate at smaller scale. Farmgate also benefits from having a team drawn from across the meat supply chain.

For the judges, the pitch could have done more to demonstrate the capability, and to explain what happens to waste and by-products.

Farmapp

Farmapp has developed a digitized and integrated pest management solution for greenhouse crops. Using data collected from various sensors and stored in the cloud, Farmapp uses visual analysis, helping farmers to reduce their use of pesticides and increase productivity. It is currently installed in 1200 greenhouses (mainly Columbia and Kenya).

The judges wondered about the competition, as they were aware of a number of other similar solutions.

iotag

This “fitbit for cattle” uses long-range GPS monitoring to track and manage livestock health. In addition to the setup costs for network base sensors, there is a monthly subscription fee to manage data.

There were no comments from the judges, apart from the representative from the farming community, who claimed to hate subscription services.

Smart-Bait

Smart-Bait uses sensors, cognitive APIs and programmed alerts to track feral animals. Current solutions (baiting, fencing, shooting) are either unreliable, inefficient, or non-selective. Instead, Smart-Bait is leveraging IoT and AI, and can be used offline giving further flexibility. Currently conducting farm trials, the founders say that there is government interest in the data.

For their part, the judges wanted to know if there were other applications for this technology – but more importantly, they wanted to know how it actually works.

Snaptrap

This product enables remote pest monitoring and control, especially fruit fly. It retrofits to existing systems, and has established a successful proof of concept. Snaptrap is targeting research, government and industry users, appealing to both growers and the bio-security market. Another subscription-based product, the founders claim there are many use cases, and the solution is scalable.

The judges asked about the data (what happens to it), and our farm rep again queried the use of a subscription model.

Thingc

With the goal of producing “intelligent orchestrated things”, Thingc aims to reduce the number of manual tasks and alleviate animal stress in livestock management. Using the notion of precision management, it takes data from monitoring sources and applies it yield forecasting.

The judges wanted to know “where’s the tech?”, who is the competition?, and what exactly is the end game?

TieUp Farming

TieUp uses an algo-based solution to compensate for the lack of data available for yield forecasting in horticulture. The data is being made available to farmers, industry and banks, using an aggregation of different technologies. The founders claim it to be both practical and customizable, while they see significant opportunities in South East Asia.

The judges wanted to know how it actually works, and to what degree it can support traceability of produce?

Water Save

As the name suggest, Water Save is designed to reduce water and power consumption on farms. With increased concerns about water efficiency and environmental impact of run-off on the Great Barrier Reef, Water Save uses existing irrigation monitoring systems (micro weather stations, sensors) and connects them into an integrated and networked solution. The system involves set up costs, hardware costs, and subscription fees, but a key goal is to reduce the use of fertilizers – creating both economic and environmental savings.

The judges wanted to know more about the solution for linking individual sensors, and whether it has the capability to monitor nitrates.

 

For most of these 3-minute pitches, the challenge was to tell enough of the “story” while still explaining how it works – and there was a sense that the audience understood the context as well as the problem, and probably didn’t need too much background explanation. Instead, they would have appreciated learning more about the technology and the potential to succeed – i.e, “why you?”.

Farmgate MSU was declared the winner by the judges, and voted the people’s choice by the audience.

Next week: ASIC updates – Sandbox and Crowdfunding (plus #FinTech hub)