Startupbootcamp’s Virtual Demo Day

Not to be defeated by the Victorian government’s Stage 3 Covid19 restrictions, Startupbootcamp decided to stream the latest Energy Australia Demo Day online. It was a bold move given that a key value of these events is the opportunity to see and meet the startup founders in person. But to the organizers’ credit, and with support from their corporate sponsors and mentors, as well as the founders themselves, it was an impressive event, and managed to connect the teams with their audience effectively.

The nine projects in the order they presented (website links embedded in the names) were:

17TeraWatts

Focused on “meeting the demands of the new solar customer”, 17TeraWatts monitors residential solar energy systems via a combination of data automation and behavioral science. It achieves this via “Bodhi 2.0”, a digital assistant for modern energy companies, designed to be the “heart and brains of home energy systems”. Once installed, it is forecast to to generate a recurring revenue stream for the 25-year life of a solar system, by delivering reporting and customer leads. At the other end, solar consumers are willing to pay for more information about, awareness of and control over their energy systems ans consumption. Currently exploring a partnership with DiUS, Bodhi 2 is also being deployed by a Victorian electricity retailer.

Renbloc

Another team addressing energy efficiency management, Renbloc provide a solution to help consumers by bringing transparency to the verification of renewable energy sources. For a monthly fee, it brings real-time monitoring and optimization to consumer energy consumption. Renbloc are also working with companies such as Asahi and Energy Australia to provide verification “certification”, a form of energy labelling that can be applied to a wide range of consumer products.

Machine Dreams

The founders at Machine Dream are deploying machine learning and data analytics to monitor equipment failure, by detecting defective power assets owned and managed by energy distribution networks. Using system-generated photos to train the algorithm, Machine Dream claim significant reduction in the time and cost it traditionally takes to monitor network equipment, and with higher accuracy rates. The overall effect is to enable the frequency of assessment, and the reduce the cost of assessment. Currently in trials with Ausnet to monitor the “poles and wires”, Machine Dream can also be used for other infrastructure assets such as bridges, railway tracks and roads. The team plan to offer licensing and SaaS business models to asset managers and manufacturers.

GenGame

This is a customer engagement platform, delivering consumer apps for energy retailers to help their customers track retail energy bills (optimization, rewards, incentives, etc.) using customized profiles. The founders claim that customer relationships become stickier, via the low cost/low touch engagement. The team comprises a mix of creatives, energy industry experts and software developers to license client solutions which are priced on the set-up costs and the number of end users. Apparently, only 10 out of 40 energy retailers in Australia have a mobile app, and GenGame has two pilot projects with Energy Australia.

Energy Master

Another solution for energy efficiency, Energy Master is focused on helping corporate clients manage their utility bills. Essentially a business information platform, the application reviews consumption, taxes and fees, tariffs and off-sets, carbon reduction and water savings. It charges 0.5% of managed energy costs as a recurring fee, and does not require any hardware investment by clients. Currently running clients trials with Energy Australia.

ELDO MeterStack

This team is also addressing energy data analysis, but at the level of the grid, particularly at the fringe end of the distribution network. Their thesis is that consumers are not engaged, and don’t know how to understand their utility data or how to value it; meanwhile, energy companies cannot access consumer data. Positioned as a data market place between consumers and energy service providers, it offers a turnkey solution for the new breed of “digital utility” companies, and is working with DiUS and MHC to support distributors and the fringe of the grid.

Energos

Describing its solution as “intelligent nodes for distributed energy systems”, Energos is using AI for energy monitoring, management and optimization. Focused on business and industrial clients, the system can operate across multiple sites and in multiple countries, ideal for multinational corporations. Adopting a monthly subscription fee model, Energos is working with Energy Australia on a pilot solution for a business client.

BEAD

Using a combination of sensors and software, the team at BEAD are delivering intelligence solutions to help building owners, managers and occupants to manage “over heating, over cooling, over lighting”. With tag lines such as “listening to your building”, and “intelligent buildings you deserve”, BEAD is aimed at telcos, smart cities and BMS & HVAC vendors. Their system analyses occupancy flow, and develops digital models of buildings to track body heat (an important consideration in the Covid19 era, as well as events such as building fires, floods and earthquakes). They also work with building insurers to deliver real-time monitoring via Blockchain and smart contracts. Claiming to deliver 30% savings in energy optimization and efficiency, BEAD is working with Energy Australia, Hydro Tasmania and Asahi.

Liquidstar

This startup deploys Blockchain enabled apps to monitor their partners’ IoT connected hardware (batteries and container charging stations). Liquidstar is an IoT solution designed to build a “wire-less grid”, with the aim of removing diesel and methane power from communities that do not have access to grid networks. One potential use case could be in battery management for Covid19 quarantine centres.

Next week: Can we come out now?

Social Distancing in Victorian Melbourne…

At the time of writing Victorians, like most of Australia, are living under a Covid19 “stay at home and practise social distancing” regime in attempt to “flatten the curve” and reduce the spread of this contagion. I have been working from home for 3 weeks, only going out for essential food shopping and a daily walk for exercise (since my gym is closed). This perambulation has revealed some lesser-seen aspects of Melbourne (apart from the empty streets), including the way the modern city’s 19th century founders went about their approach to urban design – including some examples of built-in social distancing.

The first example is the number of public parks and gardens close to the CBD that were established in the 1800s, and which have managed to survive the onslaught of developers. As we know, public parks, with their trees and green spaces act as the lungs of the city, and provide a place to exercise, relax and get some fresh air. So we need these facilities more than ever in times like these. (Strange why the Victorian Government still insists in allowing vehicles to use the culturally and historically significant Yarra Park as a public car park on so many days, with all the horticultural and environmental damage that this causes…)

Second, the decision to incorporate lane-ways into the grid design of the CBD, as well as throughout the 19th century expansion of the inner city suburbs. While their design was mainly pragmatic (ease of access for night carts, storm drainage), the result is that in densely-built areas such as Richmond, Carlton, East Melbourne, Fitzroy and Collingwood, lane-ways mean even terraced houses can have ample space between them and the next block, allowing for better ventilation, natural light and reduced risk of disease. (For an example of the lane-ways importance to Melbourne’s character and psyche, check out Daniel Crooks’ video, “An Embroidery of Voids”.)

Third, the decision not to build right up to the urban banks of the Yarra River (and the straightening and leveling of the river itself) has left them accessible to the public, both as a means of cycling and walking to/from work, and for recreational purposes. In many cities, riverfront access has largely been blocked off as adjacent land has been appropriated for private, commercial and industrial use.

At a time like this, I truly appreciate the foresight of Melbourne’s Victorian town planners – I just hope we can continue to enjoy their legacy in the coming weeks and months!

Next week: #Rona19 – beyond the memes

 

Margaret Tan and Dragon Ladies Don’t Weep

Last week, I mentioned the number of ageing rock stars having to cancel concerts. In contrast, Margaret Leng Tan, aged 74, performed a 75-minute one-person show as part of the Asia TOPA festival in Melbourne. She made it look effortless, producing an almost choreographic style of piano playing, as she performed the world premiere of “Dragon Ladies Don’t Weep”.

Both autobiographical and a tribute to two of her greatest influences, John Cage and her mother, the show is a mix of live piano, prerecorded audio, digital art, multimedia and spoken word. It is comprised of anecdotes from her life, personal musings on loss, and practical aphorisms, such as “DRC” – the “daily reality check” – a must for all artists and anyone else needing to make sense of the modern world.

Clearly a very focused and determined musician, Margaret Tan has carved out a niche for herself in the modern classical world, with her championing of the toy piano. She has made it an instrument for serious composition and concert performance.

The physicality of her performance ensured that the digital technology neither dominated nor descended into gimmickry (no “tech for tech’s sake” here). Her presence on stage was captivating yet self-contained – despite largely being all about her, it was authentic and self-effacing in equal measure.

Margaret Tan revealed two key aspects of herself that go some way to explaining her success. First, at an early age she realised she had to concentrate on the piano – she couldn’t maintain her other music and dance studies – from which we get the sense of her single-minded purpose. Second, her lifelong obsession with numbers – almost a form of synesthesia; and given the strong relationship between numbers and music, it felt that she has learned to live with, even appreciate, this “affliction” in the pursuit of her art.

If there was one thing missing, it was Margaret Tan’s own music. While she is best-known for her interpretations of John Cage and other modern composers, I was curious about her own work, and whether she has ever explored composition herself.

Next week: My Four Years in Crypto

 

Stereolab at Melbourne Zoo

There was a recent newspaper article about the number of older rock stars having to cancel tour dates due to ill health, injury and just plain old age. The irony is that when most of those performers started out as professional musicians, no-one really expected their careers to last 10 or 15 years, let alone 40 or even 50 years. Now that artists increasingly rely on income from ticket sales (rather than royalties from streaming services), there could be lean times ahead for ageing rockers – and that’s before we take the effects of COVID-19 into account. Thankfully, Stereolab were able to play at Melbourne Zoo last week, before cancelling the rest of their Asia Pacific concerts due to the virus. Of course, by comparison to much of rock’s gnarly royalty, they are mere babes, having “only” formed in 1990. And although they have not released any new material for 10 years, during which time the band has been on hiatus, Stereolab have an extensive back catalogue to draw upon now they have started touring again.

Alongside contemporaries Saint Etienne, Stereolab were part of a reaction against late-80s grunge and acid house, and between them they ushered in a return to more interesting melodic and harmonic structures, vintage/retro sounds and complex textures, all informed by an aesthetic that embraces electronica, exotica, soundtracks, bossa nova and dub effects. In fact, both bands have collaborated with similar post-rock artists on each side of the Atlantic such as Jim O’Rourke, Tortoise, Mouse on Mars and To Rococo Rot, not to mention The High Llamas’ Sean O’Hagan. (Both bands also have extensive back catalogues, with frequent non-album, one-off, limited and rare 7″ singles scattered throughout their discographies.)

By going back on the road after such a long break (and with no new material to promote), there was a risk that Stereolab might simply be going through the motions – even coming across as their own tribute act at best, a self-parody at worst. Thankfully, despite the familiarity of the songs, the band managed to keep everything sounding fresh, energetic and full of enthusiasm. And despite maintaining that original aesthetic, Stereolab have enough variety to remain interesting and avoid sounding samey – which has no doubt helped with their own longevity, unlike many contemporary artists who will likely be forgotten quicker than a Crazy Frog ringtone.

Next week: Margaret Tan and Dragon Ladies Don’t Weep