Beyond Blocks, Tokyo

Thanks to my work with Techemy and Brave New Coin, Content in Context is currently on the road, attending various blockchain and crypto events in Tokyo, Vienna, NYC and Chicago. The next few blogs will attempt to capture notes from the field.

In Tokyo, the Beyond Blocks Summit was a stellar affair, with marquee blockchain projects and major investors presenting on stage, alongside cosplay characters, light shows, upbeat music and a crowd of crypto fanatics.

Given the significant developments in Japan’s regulatory framework for crypto-currency trading, there was a lot of interest in the presentations by bitFlyer, Quoine and Smart Contract Inc.

As with the recent APAC Blockchain Conference in Melbourne, there was a strong representation from China’s growing base of Blockchain projects (but not ICOs, of course), keen to demonstrate their infrastructure projects.

There was much debate about regulatory developments across Asia, made all the more interesting by the announcement that Monex is acquiring Coincheck, despite (or because of?) the recent hack on NEM tokens held on the local exchange.

Among international key speakers were Patrick Byrne from Overstock and tZERO, John Burbank of Passport Capital, and Techemy’s own Fran Strajnar – all looking to the future of this new asset class, especially so-called security tokens.

Interspersed throughout the two days were panel discussions and presentations on scaling, infrastructure, decentralized exchanges, stable coins and the future of ICOs.

Although this was only their second event of this kind, the Beyond Blocks team have quickly established themselves on the conference circuit.

Next week: Crypto-Asset Summit, Vienna

Tech Talk on Crypto

There’s an adage about not investing in something you don’t understand. There’s another about not betting more than you can afford to lose. And then there’s crypto, which in the words of TV commentator, John Oliver represents “Everything you don’t understand about money combined with everything you don’t understand about computers.” So it was with great interest that I attended last week’s General Assembly’s Tech Talk on Crypto, presented by a team from Bitcoin.com.au.

This intro to crypto was actually very illuminating, as much for the audience questions as the presentation itself.

To begin with, there was an attempt to explain the underlying technology of Blockchain; which, thanks to a certain YouTube video, seemingly reduced Blockchain to a trading platform or networked database. There was also an analogy to the internet itself: first, we just had protocols like TCP/IP; then we had web browsers; next we had e-mail clients; now we have Netflix.

Next was a reference to Bitcoin‘s mining infrastructure, its associated monetary policy, and the specifics of Bitcoin’s tokenomics. And then we jumped straight to Ethereum and the development of smart contracts – with particular reference to their potential to disrupt/transform the legal profession and the insurance industry.

There was brief mention Venezuela’s “petro”, a government-issued, oil-backed cryptocurrency, as evidence of further disruption in financial markets (although the petro has raised a number of concerns in some quarters). And, in a week when revelations about Facebook and Cambridge Analytica dominated the news, the speakers talked about Blockchain applications displacing even core social media, offering more privacy and control over our personal data and content.

The first of the audience questions were about crypto valuations. “The market decides”, which prompted some comments about market volatility and speculation. There were also some comments about regulation, tax, privacy and security.

Next question: “What about hacking?” “That’s more of a problem with exchanges, than user wallets.” That lead to a brief discussion of different types of wallet, which I’m not sure everyone in the audience fully understood.

We then moved on to look at other types of coins, and specific Blockchain use cases (such as remittance services, patient healthcare records, identity, P2P solar energy trading, voting, education etc.). In particular, Golem (crypto-powered network computing), Brave (crypto-enabled web browser), Steemit (earn crypto from your content) and TenX (an everyday crypto payment solution) were projects that the presenters liked.

Finally, to underscore how little some people understand about fiat currency and traditional financial markets, one attendee, struggling to fathom how the price of Bitcoin was determined, insisted that with equity markets, “the Stock Exchange sets the price…”

Next week: Startup VIC’s Retail & E-Commerce Pitch Night